Is Your Child on Track?

Walking, talking, playing, and much more…

 

All children develop at individual and different rates, and there is a wide range of “typical” development. If you score more than ___ or have concerns, continue the next 3 months with suggested activities and re-assess your child’s progress on the 3 to 6 month milestones markers or, schedule consultation via skype or in a clinic near you and print and bring this assessment with you to your appointment.      

Remember – you can ‘check’ the boxes before you print!

 

6

Birth to 3 Months

 

PRENATAL

 

⃝     Prenatal care was started after the first trimester

⃝     Mother had a fall or car accident

⃝    Your baby was born premature

 

Did you experience any of the following during the delivery?

⃝     fetal distress

⃝     maternal hypertension

⃝     prolonged labor

⃝     cord complications

⃝     low Apgar score

⃝     Cesarean delivery

⃝     This child was the first or third born child

⃝     Mother was over 30

⃝     Father was over 40

⃝     Father had infections and/or exposure to toxic chemicals

⃝     Mother lived in an urbanized area during her pregnancy

⃝     Mother had excessive weight gain during her pregnancy

⃝     Mother had thyroid dysfunction during her pregnancy

⃝     Mother’s BMI was greater than 35

⃝     Mother has Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

⃝     Mother has Lupus

⃝     Mother had gestational diabetes

⃝     Mother had asthma during the pregnancy

⃝     Mother had bleeding during the pregnancy

⃝     Mother had toxemia during the pregnancy

⃝     Mother had an infection during the pregnancy

⃝     Mother had nausea/vomiting during the pregnancy

⃝     Mother was on medications during the pregnancy, if yes answer the following two questions.

⃝     Mother was taking psychiatric medication during the pregnancy

⃝     Mother was using asthma medication during this pregnancy

⃝     Mother used supplements during her pregnancy

⃝     Mother used acetaminophen during her pregnancy

⃝     Mother drank alcohol during the pregnancy

⃝     Mother smoked during the pregnancy

⃝     Mother had depression, emotional strain, or was under psychiatric care during the pregnancy

 


 3 months

      MILESTONES

 

  • Tracks a slowly moving object 8-12” away

  • Brings hand to mouth

  • Mouths toys

  • Turns head toward direction of sound

  • Startled by loud noises

  • Makes noises other than crying

  • Looks at human faces or black and white patterns

  • Cries, but is comforted when picked up and held

  • Begins to develop a social smile

  • Swallows liquids with no difficulty

  • Sleeps for 4- to 10-hour intervals

  • Enjoys bath time

  • Raises head briefly when lying on stomach

  • Grasps and shakes hand toys

  • Moves arms and legs more smoothly                                                     

      SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

 

  • Present colorful objects for baby to look at

  • Talk and sing to baby

  • Hang mobiles, play music, make animated faces

  • Help baby’s motor development by engaging in ‘tummy time’ every day

  • Give baby plenty of cuddle time and body massages

  • Encourages baby’s responses by presenting objects with bright colors and faces

  • Talk to baby every day to show that language is used to communicate

4 to 6 Months

 

MILESTONES

 

  • Plays with rattle placed in hand

  • Purposely drops an object to watch it fall

  • Pulls a cloth from face

  • Smiles a lot; can laugh; coos when caregiver speaks

  • Babbles chains of sounds

  • Responds to own name

  • Enjoys social play

  • Expresses desire to be picked up

  • Interested in mirror images

  • Swallows pureed foods

  • Uses tongue to move food in mouth

  • Closes lips while swallowing

  • Transfers object from hand to hand

  • Sits up and stands with support

  • Rolls both ways – front to back, back to front

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

 

  • Present objects such as rattles, for baby to play with

  • Help baby sit up with support during play time and during bath time

  • Encourage baby to practice ‘tummy time’, roll over, and reach for objects while playing

  • Offer toys that allow two-handed exploration and play

  • Talk to baby to encourage language development; baby may begin to babble

  • Respond with pleasure to baby’s sounds

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

 

  • Refuses to cuddle

  • Doesn’t show affection for caregiver

  • Seems very stiff, or very floppy

  • Head still flops back when body is pulled to a sitting position

  • Doesn’t respond to sounds around him/her

  • Doesn’t smile, laugh or make squealing sounds

  • Has difficulty getting objects to mouth

  • Doesn’t roll over in either direction – front to back, or back to front

  • Cannot sit with help

 

*If you have any questions concerning your child’s development, or the rate at which he/she is meeting milestones, call and schedule a consultation appointment at the clinic nearest you or schedule an online consultation via Skype, and Dr. Dib will answer any questions you may have and guide you in your child’s development. The information above was compiled from various sources. All information is for informational purposes only; it is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice.

7 to 12 Months

 

      MILESTONES

 

  • Finds hidden objects

  • Pokes with index finger

  • Looks at pictures in a book

  • Says “ma-ma” and “da-da”; waves bye-bye

  • Responds to name; follows simple spoken command; uses simple gestures, such as shaking head for “no”

  • Points to request something

  • Shows specific preferences for certain people and toys

  • Plays simple games

  • Plays well for short time with two or three children

  • Feeds self finger foods; closes mouth on rim of cup; picks up cup and takes 4-5 swallows

  • Sleeps through the nights; takes 1-2 daytime naps

  • Helps with dressing or undressing

  • Crawls on belly; pulls self up to standing position; walks while holding onto furniture

      SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

 

  • Play “peek-a-boo”, puppets, wave bye-bye; encourage two-way communication by responding to baby’s noises

  • Establish a regular bedtime with a calming ritual starting one hour prior

  • Help baby stand while holding baby’s hands

  • Baby-proof baby’s environment

  • Use gestures such as waving goodbye to help convey meaning; name and describe objects during everyday activities

  • Use picture books to work on communication and bonding

  • While standing at sofa, set a toy slightly out of reach to encourage walking while using furniture as support

 

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

 

  • Doesn’t learn to use gestures, such as waving hand or shaking head

  • Drags one side of body while crawling (for over one month); asymmetry between the two sides of body; or body too stiff or too floppy

  • Doesn’t search for objects baby sees being hidden

  • Doesn’t respond to name or say single words; doesn’t babble

  • Doesn’t point to objects or pictures

  • Can’t stand when supported; can’t sit with help

  • Doesn’t actively reach for objects

  • Doesn’t follow objects with both eyes at near (one foot) and far (six feet) ranges

Shows no interest in games of peek-a-boo                                                                                                                           *If you have any questions concerning your child’s development, or the rate at which he/she is meeting milestones, call and schedule a consultation appointment at the clinic nearest you or schedule an online consultation via Skype, and Dr. Dib will answer any questions you may have and guide you in your child’s development. The information above was compiled from various sources. All information is for informational purposes only; it is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice.​

12 to 17 Months

 

 

MILESTONES

 

  • Looks at picture book with adult

  • Places objects into cups; dumps out contents

  • Knows what everyday objects are for (brush, telephone, etc.)

  • Points to wanted object

  • Can follow 1-step verbal command without gestures (i.e. “sit down”); protests by saying “no,” shaking head or frowning

  • Uses at least 5 words; points to at least 3 body parts when asked

  • Separates easily from caregiver in familiar environment; may cling in new situations; may have tantrums

  • Plays alone for short periods; extends toy to show others

  • Enjoys simple make-believe play

  • Chews textured foods; eats finger foods; stirs with spoon; drinks from cup; sips from straw

  • Sleeps through the night; one daytime nap

  • Fusses when diaper needs changing

  • Walks alone; walks backwards, and down stairs with help

  • Enjoys pushing or pulling toys while walking

  • Holds crayon with fingers, hand on top, forearm turned so thumb is directed downward

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

 

  • Give your child choices whenever possible; ask your child questions to help stimulate decision-making process

  • Offer toys such as ride and pull toys, jack-in-the-box, music toys, and balls

  • Let your child scribble with thick washable crayons or markers

  • Encourage child to stack blocks and then knock them down

  • Establish consistency with routines like mealtimes and bedtimes

  • Sing, play music for, and read to your child regularly

  • Teach your baby to imitate your actions, including clapping your hands, blowing kisses, and playing finger games

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

 

  • Doesn’t point to objects that he wants

  • Doesn’t spoon-feed and drink from cup independently

  • Doesn’t stack 2-4 objects

  • Doesn’t make eye contact

  • Does not respond to name

  • Cannot walk

  • Doesn’t seem to know function of common household objects

  • Doesn’t respond to simple verbal requests; doesn’t have at least 5 words

  • Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he/she once had

 

*If you have any questions concerning your child’s development, or the rate at which he/she is meeting milestones, call and schedule a consultation appointment at the clinic nearest you or schedule an online consultation via Skype, and Dr. Dib will answer any questions you may have and guide you in your child’s development. The information above was compiled from various sources. All information is for informational purposes only; it is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice.

19 Months to 2 Years

 

      MILESTONES

 

  • Can name 5 or more objects

  • Follows 2-step directions (pick up your toy and put it in the basket)

  • Stacks 6-7 blocks

  • Has 20-50 words; uses 2-word phrases

  • Points and names objects in a book

  • Can point to and name 15 or more pictures of common objects when named

  • Sings familiar songs

  • Listens quietly to story, music or TV

  • Curious; gets into everything; often defiant; has difficulty sharing; wants caregiver nearby if upset

  • Verbalizes bowel and bladder needs (50% of the time); tries to wash own hands and face

  • Begins using fork; uses spoon independently

  • Puts on simple clothing

  • Walks well; walks backward

  • Dances, jumps, runs and kicks; rides tricycle

  • Draws using circular, vertical and horizontal strokes

     SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

 

  • Give your child two choices when possible

  • Read to your child; label, describe and talk about pictures in the book

  • Color with your child and teach him games

  • Teach your child simple clapping games

  • Teach your baby what sounds animals make and practice by using an animal picture book

  • Teach your child to throw and catch a ball

  • Teach your child about dangerous things; consequences should be given for dangerous behavior after warnings

  • Let your child make choices about food

  • Reduce in-between snacks so he/she will be hungry at mealtimes

 

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

 

  • Doesn’t point to objects when named

  • Doesn’t spoon-feed and drink from cup independently

  • Doesn’t stack 2-4 objects

  • Doesn’t copy others

  • Doesn’t gain new words

  • Cannot walk

  • Doesn’t make eye contact

  • Doesn’t use 2-word sentences

  • Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he/she once had

 

*If you have any questions concerning your child’s development, or the rate at which he/she is meeting milestones, call and schedule a consultation appointment at the clinic nearest you or schedule an online consultation via Skype, and Dr. Dib will answer any questions you may have and guide you in your child’s development. The information above was compiled from various sources. All information is for informational purposes only; it is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice.

 

2 Years

   MILESTONES

 

  • Can tell his/her own age

  • Understands “one,” “one more,” and “all”

  • Imitates behavior of others; especially adults and older children

  • Begins to sort by shapes and colors

  • Says 500 words; understands 900 words

  • Uses 2-3 word sentences

  • Loves picture books

  • Begins make-believe play

  • Is shy around strangers

  • Recognizes when someone else is happy or sad

  • Feeds himself with spoon

  • Removes shoes, socks, and pants; unzips zipper

  • Kicks large ball; jumps in place; stands on tiptoe

  • Uses adult grasp when holding a pencil

  • Catches ball, trapping against chest

 

   SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

 

  • Explore the pages in a book each day; point to and label pictures

  • Play make-believe and dress up

  • Allow toddler to play with spoons, cups, pots pans

  • Label items throughout the day especially when out in the community

  • Play outdoors with water or sand box; play indoors with arts and crafts such as play-doh and paints

  • Sing and dance to music; engage in finger play to rhymes and music

  • Practice sorting, matching objects around the home such as socks

    WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

 

  • Does not make eye contact; does not respond to name

  • Does not use gestures to communicate such as pointing

  • Doesn’t follow simple instructions; doesn’t use two-word sentences; doesn’t imitate actions or words

  • Can’t push a wheeled toy

  • Repetitive movements with objects; repetitive movements or posturing of body, arms, hands, or fingers

  • Child seems more interested in objects than people; does not show interest in other children

  • Resists change in daily routine

  • Uses people as “tools” to meet their needs

  • Spins objects, has odd play

  • Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he/she once had

 

 

*If you have any questions concerning your child’s development, or the rate at which he/she is meeting milestones, call and schedule a consultation appointment at the clinic nearest you or schedule an online consultation via Skype, and Dr. Dib will answer any questions you may have and guide you in your child’s development. The information above was compiled from various sources. All information is for informational purposes only; it is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice.

 

3 Years

 

     MILESTONES

 

  • Can say name, age and sex

  • Stacks 9-10 blocks

  • Matches three colors

  • Points to pictures of common objects described by their use (e.g. “Show me what you eat with.”)

  • Knows nearly 1,000 words; mean sentence length is 3.4 words

  • Understands most sentences

  • Follow instructions with 2 or 3 steps

  • Starts asking “why”; understands “in,” “on,” and “under”

  • Becomes more social; makes friends easily

  • May show more fears (of dark, of monsters)

  • Can take turns in games; starts sharing toys

  • Changes activities when requested

  • Understands concept of “mine” and “his/hers”

  • Eats on his own

  • Stabs food with fork and brings to mouth

  • Daytime control of toileting needs with occasional accidents

  • Copies drawing a circle

  • Stands on one foot for 3 seconds; kicks a ball at least 6 feet; pedals tricycle

  • Threads four small beads on string

     SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

 

  • Help child understand and ask questions

  • Ask questions such as “Are you a boy?”

  • Expand vocabulary; name body parts, and identify what you do with them– “This is my nose. I can smell flowers.”

  • Use photographs of familiar people and places, and retell stories of events

  • Let your child help with cooking by pouring ingredients and stirring things together

  • Cut and sort pictures from a magazine into categories

  • Expand on social communication and storytelling skills and “acting out”

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

 

  • Frequent falling and difficulty with stairs

  • Persistent drooling or very unclear speech; cannot communicate in short phrases

  • Cannot build a tower of more than four blocks

  • Cannot copy a circle by age 3

  • No involvement in pretend play

  • Doesn’t understand simple directions

  • Little interest in other children

  • Poor eye contact

  • Extreme difficulty separating form mother or primary caregiver

  • Limited interest in toys; difficulty manipulating small objects

  • Restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior or interests

  • Unusual preoccupation with objects such as light switches, fans, spinning objects

  • Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he/she once had

 

*If you have any questions concerning your child’s development, or the rate at which he/she is meeting milestones, call and schedule a consultation appointment at the clinic nearest you or schedule an online consultation via Skype, and Dr. Dib will answer any questions you may have and guide you in your child’s development. The information above was compiled from various sources. All information is for informational purposes only; it is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice.

4 Years

 

MILESTONES

 

  • Tells own age and full name

  • Interested in new experiences

  • Plays “mom” or “dad”

  • Uses up to 6 words in a sentence; has vocabulary of over 2,000 words; speaks clearly

  • Asks for assistance when needed

  • Sings a song or says a poem from memory, i.e. “Wheels on the Bus”

  • Follows directions and obeys authority figure; may increase misbehavior

  • Cooperates with other children; waits for turn

  • Sits quietly to listen to story/music

  • Dresses and undresses; can lace shoes; brushes own teeth

  • Wants to be independent

  • Is toilet trained and washes hands without help

  • Catches ball with hands; rides bicycle with training wheels

  • Walks up and down stairs alternating feet, without support

  • Holds crayon with thumb and finger; can copy a square

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

 

  • Read aloud every day; tell stories that have interesting characters; discuss the stories together

  • Draw, finger-paint, cut and paste to help develop motor skills; play with Legos and blocks

  • Schedule weekly play dates or activities with other children

  • Play with balls to throw, catch and kick

  • Encourage development of large muscles by allowing child to run, climb and swing on playground equipment.

  • Encourage independence in getting dressed, brushing his teeth and simple household chores

  • Encourage your child to use language to express ideas, and feelings

  • Recite rhymes, poems and sing songs

  • Practice writing letters and numbers

  • Use blocks, straws, sticks and other objects to make shape patterns

      WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

 

  • Doesn’t follow simple instructions

  • Doesn’t use 2-3 word sentences

  • Doesn’t imitate actions or words

  • Shows no interest in interactive games; does not interact with other children

  • Still clings or cries when parents leave him

  • Ignores other children or doesn’t respond to people outside the family

  • Can’t retell a favorite story

  • Doesn’t engage in fantasy or dramatic play

  • Appears to ignore speech; hears “only what he wants to”

 

*If you have any questions concerning your child’s development, or the rate at which he/she is meeting milestones, call and schedule a consultation appointment at the clinic nearest you or schedule an online consultation via Skype, and Dr. Dib will answer any questions you may have and guide you in your child’s development. The information above was compiled from various sources.  All information is for informational purposes only; it is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice.

5 Years

 

MILESTONES

 

  • Understands a few written words

  • Draws a person with 6 recognizable parts

  • Understands opposites; understands real and make-believe

  • Recites telephone number

  • Plays group games following rules

  • Participates in conversations

  • Understands concepts “yesterday/today” “before/after” “most/least”

  • Identifies and counts up to 10

  • Starts to print some letters of name

  • Share information about and event or story

  • Answers “why” questions by giving reason

  • Puts on shirt and pants independently

  • Uses toilet independently

  • Can take shower or bath independently

  • Cuts out shapes with scissors

  • Throws ball 10 feet overhead

  • Can do a somersault

SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

 

  • Use descriptive words and complete sentences to express thoughts and ideas

  • Sort and count objects and identify written corresponding number

  • Practice writing numbers and letters; practice printing name

  • Teach personal information such as age, phone number, and address

  • Give instructions that involve several simple directions in a row

  • Read a story to the child and ask her/him what happened first, next and last

  • Give child simple tasks to do daily and praise him/her for completion

  • Ask questions and engage child in conversation about daily events

  • Have child practice using scissors; cut out shapes and objects in a magazine

  • Encourage independence and responsibility: give child jobs like setting table, putting laundry away

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED

 

  • Shows extreme behavior (unusually fearful, aggressive, sad)

  • Shows no interest in interactive games; does not interact with other children

  • Still clings or cries when parents leave him

  • Doesn’t respond to people outside the family

  • Can’t tell what’s real and what’s make-believe

  • Can’t give first and last name

  • Doesn’t draw pictures

  • Doesn’t engage in fantasy or dramatic play

  • Appears to ignore speech; hears “only what he wants to”

 

If you have any questions concerning your child’s development, or the rate at which he/she is meeting milestones, call and schedule a consultation appointment at the clinic nearest you or schedule an online consultation via Skype, and Dr. Dib will answer any questions you may have and guide you in your child’s development. The information above was compiled from various sources.  All information is for informational purposes only; it is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice.

 

Call Us: 1-800-000-0000   /   info@mysite.com   /  500 Terry Francois Street San Francisco, CA  94158

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